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The recipe for Easy Homemade Spelt Bread has been on Eva in the Kitchen for almost two years now, and is one of the most visited recipes on my site. It is also one of the most commented recipes, and many of you have given their tips and tricks to help others and to help improve the recipe. So I reckoned it was about time for an update, with new pictures, and more importantly, all your (and my) tips and tricks integrated in the recipe.

The smell of fresh bread is one of my favourite things in the world. And clearly, I’m not the only one who feels this way. The scent of fresh bread, fake or real, is one of the tricks supermarkets use to entice us into buying more. I always shop with a grocery list, which helps me to resist the temptation of buying more than I need. But that bread scent does make me leave the supermarket incredibly hungry!

Fresh crusty bread is the main reason I’ll never even try going Paleo or low carb. Imagine never sinking your teeth in a crunchy bread, straight from the oven and still warm. Missing out on that sounds like complete horror to me.

Easy Homemade Spelt Bread, by Eva in the Kitchen

That’s why I’m giving you the recipe for this easy homemade spelt bread (no knead!). It’s not my own and I know it’s been shared by many people before, but since I’m still handing it out to friends who’ve never heard of this fantastic recipe, I think it deserves to be mentioned yet another time!

The great thing is that you don’t need any kneading. Though a bit of aggressive kneading is sometimes just what you need to unwind, if that’s the case, make pizza dough. It’s literally just 5 minutes of work, and after that the dough does all the work for you. The only thing you’ll need to remember, is to invest those 5 minutes about a day in advance. The dough takes at least 12 hours (but even better is 16-24 hours) to rise.

Easy Homemade Spelt Bread, by Eva in the Kitchen

Besides 5 minutes of work you’ll also need a cast iron pot (Dutch oven) with a lid, one that you use in the oven at very high temperatures. I have a cute blue vintage pot. When my grandmother passed away, my grandfather felt like he didn’t need a lot of kitchen tools anymore. So he gave away a lot of her pans, and I was the lucky one to receive this fantastic blue one. Imagine all the dishes this pan made throughout the years, first by my grandmother and now by me. I really like that idea.

Easy Homemade Spelt Bread, by Eva in the Kitchen

IMPORTANT
A few general tips before you start baking (with many thanks to all the tips and comments from you all!):
– I’ve received many questions regarding the oven temperature, and if you’re really supposed to set it that high. And yes, you are supposed to set the temperature that high. HOWEVER: there are two kinds of Dutch ovens, there are those that are made of thick cast iron, and there are Dutch ovens that have rather thin sides and bottoms. If you’re pot is not made of thick cast iron, I advise you to not go over 230 C / 450 F, to prevent it from burning, and to watch your bread during the bake. Another tip I have for those who have a Dutch oven with a thin bottom, or a Dutch oven that is just older and doesn’t have a very smooth surface anymore: use a piece of baking/parchment paper on the bottom of the pan, to prevent the bread from sticking.
– I’ve gotten lots of questions on the dough being too wet or too dry. The amount of water that flour absorbs is always a bit difficult to predict, as it depends on the weather, altitude, and condition of the flour. Maybe your flour doesn’t absorb as much water and you’ll be left with a pretty liquid dough. Though it’s never very easy to form the dough into a ball with the no-knead method, as it is a very wet dough, sometimes it’s almost impossible. What you can do in those cases: skip the second rise and ‘pour’ your too wet dough directly in the very hot pan and proceed like described in the recipe. I’ve done this several times with success. This method will give you a flatter bread than when shaped into a ball first, that’s the downside of it.
– The spelt flour I mostly use is organic and from the brands  Moulin des Moines (which I buy at Bio c’ Bon in Paris) and Smaakt (which I buy at Plus in the Netherlands). The flour I use doesn’t look that different from ‘regular’ flour. I know some of you use very dark spelt flour, this can explain why your breads look darker than my bread does on the pictures.
– If you’re time pressed you can skip the second rise, but know that your bread will be flatter than with a second rise.

If you have more tips, please leave a comment below.

Bon appétit!

PS If you like spelt recipes, I’m sure you’ll love my spelt waffles, fluffy spelt pancakes or healthy spelt breakfast muffins. I also have a no-knead recipe for whole wheat bread made with beer!

Easy Homemade Spelt Bread, by Eva in the Kitchen

Easy Homemade Bread
 
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • IMPORTANT: Please have a look at the list of baking tips & tricks in the post
  • 400 gr (2 + ⅔ cups) of spelt flour*
  • 2 tsp of salt
  • ¼ tsp of dried instant yeast
  • 300 ml (1 + ½ cup + 3 tbsp) of lukewarm water
Instructions
  1. Mix the flour, the salt and the yeast together in a big bowl
  2. Add the water and stir briefly, just until it has mixed
  3. Cover the bowl with plastic foil and leave it to rise slowly over 12-14 hours at room temperature (I usually do this overnight)
  4. After the dough has risen dramatically, and is all bubbly and sticky, flour your work surface
  5. Pour/scrape it out of the bowl and with well flowered hands you shape the dough into a ball
  6. Place this in a lightly greased bowl and leave to rise for about an hour
  7. Meanwhile preheat the oven to 250C/480F (for more information on the temperature,please read the baking tips in the post!) WITH the cast iron pot, including the lid, inside.
  8. The pot needs to get just as hot as the oven before you put in the dough
  9. After the hour of extra rise, place the dough inside the hot pot and cover it with the lid
  10. Bake for 30 minutes with the lid on
  11. After 30 minutes, take the lid off and bake for another 15 minutes, if the crust is already very brown, turn the heat down by 50 C / 120 F.
  12. Take the bread out of the oven en let it cool a bit
  13. You can test if the bread is well baked by tapping on the bottom of the bread, if it sounds hollow, than it's done.
Notes
* Spelt flour can be substituted for normal white flour or whole wheat flour

Easy Homemade Spelt Bread, by Eva in the Kitchen

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96 Responses

  1. michelle

    I’d been considering substituting spelt in the no-knead recipe but was worried it would mess up the beauty of the original. But after seeing these pics I have to try it. Looks gorgeous!

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Michelle, I’ve had no problems using spelt in this no knead version. Let me know how yours turns out!
      Have a nice weekend!

      Reply
  2. Lynn

    Hi Eva. This recipe looks awesome…of friend of mine just sent it to me. We’re both very Paleo. So I just wanted to share that being Paleo should not mean NEVER sinking your teeth into bread or other treats. We eat natural and healthy (with fruit and potatoes! doesn’t need to be low carb!) most of the time, so we feel just fine about enjoying crusty bread recipes like yours from time to time. Books on Paleo or Primal living recommend committing 80-85% of the time. So that leaves plenty of room to enjoy other things, if one’s body isn’t affected too much. Just wanted to clarify. Can’t wait to try your recipe!

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Lynn, thanks for your comment and the extra info! I like the 80-20 rule a lot, good to hear you can apply it to Paleo too. Have a great (20 % :-)) weekend!

      Reply
  3. tina

    Hi!
    So lets say your too impatient to wait until tomorrow to bake this, could I make up the dough and bake it after 3 to 4 hours??

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Tina,
      I’m afraid the long wait is essential for the bread. That’s why you don’t have to knead it, and why it’s much wetter than normal dough.
      Hope you’re patient enough to wait :)
      Enjoy the bread!

      Reply
    • Benjy

      The yeast needs the time to break down the flour. Before reading this I made mine up last night and set it in the fridge overnight. Not having a dutch oven (My wife got it in the divorce) I shaped it, proofed it for two hours at 85F in a bread tin (9×3.5×5) and just now removed it from a 400F oven. It was placed in the oven and THEN set the oven at 400F for 35 min, tented a sheet of aluminum foil over it and baked for another 15 min. at same temperature. Alright! I broke my rule and cut a piece while it was still hot, buttered it and Yummy. Tonight I’ll make up another batch and proof it overnight at room (72F) temperature, using Eva’s suggestions. Gotta go. That bread is calling.

      Reply
  4. Marian zomer

    Hello Eva. Is there a maximum temperature for pre heating the oven?
    Thank you from Marian in the Netherlands.

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Marian,
      Most normal kitchen ovens go to 230 or 250 C, if yours goes to 250, I advise to use that temperature. Happy baking!

      Reply
      • Sarah

        Thank you for this recipe! I am on the FODMAP diet and just found out that spelt is allowed on the diet, under a certain quantity. I wanted to let you know – tried baking this recipe today using the hottest temp allowed by my oven. My oven goes up to 550 farenheit. So, needless to say, it came out a lump of coal after the baking time. I will reduce it to 480ish farenheit (250 celsius) tomorrow and I’m sure it will turn out perfectly! I’ve also been using the Bob’s Red Mill spelt flour, and am finding that it is incredibly absorbant – always seem to need to add a few more tablespoons of water in order to get the right consistency. Hope these nuggets of info help everyone. I’m on my 3rd loaf, still trying to get spelt to behave for me.

      • Eva in the Kitchen

        Hi Sarah, Thanks for sharing! I bake mine at 250 celsius (that’s the hottest temperature for normal consumer ovens over here), I’ll make a note of your experience in the recipe!

    • Benjy

      I know that just about every recipe calls for preheating, but I found that my bread has time to rise just a little more if I start the bread dough in an un-preheated oven. Making pizza, though, the oven is as hot as it will safely go before introducing the pizza.

      Reply
  5. fiona mcbride

    I have made this bread a few times and it is lovely – tried 1/2 white spelt and 1/2 wholemeal and works well – my kids love it for breakfast and I freeze roll sized ones for packed lunches. Only problem is it doe not rise much but looks and tastes good anyway

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Fiona,
      So nice to hear you’re making this regularly! It’s one of my favorites as well, you’re right that it doesn’t rise as much as ‘normal’ made bread, I guess that’s a result of the dough being on the wet side. Happy Baking!

      Reply
      • Betty

        Is it best to leave it out on the counter or in the refrigerator?

      • Eva in the Kitchen

        Hi Betty,
        It’s best to leave the dough on the counter, at room temperature. The process of rising will be slowed down because of the cold in the fridge. Bon appétit and have a great weekend!

  6. Mandy

    Hi Eva! I really would love to try this recipe but I was wondering if you could convert the grams to cups of flower , and also what to do if I wanted to double the recipe? I would like to prep this today, so please respond as soon as possible. I am really craving some yummy home made bread!
    thanks Mandy

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Mandy,
      Great that you want to try this bread! I’ve written the recipe a while ago, before I started to give both measurements for each recipe (grams and cups). I’ve added them to this recipe as well. As far as doubling the quantities goes, I’ve never made a loaf of that size (mainly because my cast iron pan isn’t that big) so I haven’t tried this myself, but I think you can double everything. I do think it will need a bit longer in the oven. Bon appétit!

      Reply
  7. Linda

    Hi Eva!
    This bread looks fantastic! What size is your dutch oven? I would think if mine is to big or to small, the bread may be to flat or to tall!
    Thank You!

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Linda,

      I don’t think the size of the oven is that defining, my Dutch oven is way bigger than the amount of dough I put in it. And it still rises nicely :-) It’s not necessary for the dough to touch the sides of the pan.
      Bon appétit!

      Reply
  8. john

    hello, i,m trying to make this recipe but after leaving overnight 16/17 hours i cant form the dough into a ball its to floppy ,any ideas why ?

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi John,
      The amount of water that flour absorbs is always a bit difficult to predict, as it depends on the weather, altitude, and condition of the flour. Maybe yours doesn’t absorb as much water. Though it’s never very easy to form the dough into a ball with the no-knead method, as it is a very wet dough. What you can try is to ‘pour’ your too wet dough in the very hot pan and proceed like described.
      Best, Eva

      Reply
  9. maria

    hi Eva,
    how long do you preheat the dutch oven? do you preheat for the whole hour, while it rises the second time?
    thanks,
    maria

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Maria,
      Sorry for my late reply, I’m currently on a holiday and don’t always have acces to internet. To be honest, I preheat my oven until it says it has reached to desired temperature (my oven has a function for this, there’s a little indication light that stops when the oven is warm enough). This roughly takes about 30 minutes in my case, so I’d go for 30-40 minutes to be safe. Bon appétit!

      Reply
  10. An

    Hi,
    I was wondering if I could use sprouted spelt flour instead of wholemeal spelt flour? Thank you! I have never made bread before, so I am excited to try this out!

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi An,
      I’ve never used sprouted flour before, so I don’t have any experience. However, if I go by what I’ve read about it, I think you can give it try. Happy baking!

      Reply
      • Heather

        Hi, Just thought I’d let you know that I just made this recipe with sprouted spelt flour and it turned out great! :-) In fact, other than dealing with the hot oven/dutch oven, my 5 year old did all the work. :-)

      • Eva in the Kitchen

        Hi Heather, that’s great! Thanks for sharing, I’m sure this will help others who’d like to try sprouted spelt. And it’s so cool that you have your 5 year old helping out in the kitchen! Have a great weekend, eva

  11. Anke

    Hi,

    I just baked the bread and it tastes great but the crust turned out a bit darker than I hoped it would. Especially the bottom, it was all black and burnt and it really stuck to the pan. It could be that my Dutch oven is too old and the bottom isn’t function as it should. Can I use baking paper next time? And should I reduce the heat at one point? The crust was already darker than yours when I took the lid of after 30 minutes… Thanks!

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Anke,
      That’s strange! I’m sorry your bread turned out too dark but I’m happy to hear it tasted good nonetheless ;-)
      Is your Dutch oven maybe a bit on the thin side? A thin bottom could make your bread too dark. An other explanation could be that your oven temperature is actually higher than the set temperature. Most normal ovens aren’t very exact. You could use a special oven thermometer to check this (they aren’t that expensive and really help with baking goods). I don’t know why it stuck to the pan though, I think using baking paper is definitely a good idea.
      I hope these tips help!

      Reply
  12. A.A. Bruisee

    I’ve made no-knead spelt bread a couple of times. The recipe I used called for one TBSP vital wheat gluten also. The second rise was two hours vs the one in this recipe. Even if you don’t have the vital wheat gluten, I would try letting the dough rise another hour. Some people have really cold kitchens, so an hour on the counter top may not be enough. I use a $7 oven thermometer to determine oven temperature. My oven thermostat is so out of calibration that I can set the thermostat to 425F and, when thermostat turns oven off, oven thermometer reads 510F.

    Reply
  13. Nikoleta

    hI! Can’t wait to try this! Just a question…Can I substitute dry instant yeast for dry active yeast? thanks!!

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Nikoleta, I think you can, but I think it’s best to dissolve your yeast in some water first like you normally would with active yeast. I haven’t tried this myself (dry active yeast isn’t sold here normally), so it would be an experiment ;-)
      Happy baking and enjoy the weekend!

      Reply
  14. Sybil Garrison

    Could you possibly bake this bread without a Dutch oven, just in the oven, at 450F?
    I have a small counter oven.
    I have made sprouted spelt flour bread before, but with the traditional method of raising, punching and raising some more. Thanks for any advice. Your bread looks delicious.

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Sybil, I’m afraid the Dutch oven is necessary to provide a steamy environment. You could try to replace it with a small ovenproof casserole or even an normal small pan (as long as they can stand the heat), making a lid out of tin foil. I hope those fit in your oven? Good luck!

      Reply
  15. Lola

    Hi. Your bread looks easy and delicious !!! I bought a pot that I though was a Dutch oven but it only goes up to 400F. Can I still bake it at a lower temp but for longer ?

    Thanks !

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen

      Thank you Lola!
      You can use this pot, just be aware of the fact that there will be less steam development, probably resulting in a flatter bread with a less ‘crunchy’ crust. That said, I think it will still work, but the result might be a little less impressive than you hoped.
      Bon appétit! Eva

      Reply
  16. Anna

    This recipe is very similar to my daughter-in-love’s(law), except she cooks the dough in a loaf pan and has a tray placed on the lower rack of the oven where she then pours a cup of water into the hot tray during cooking. This may help those who only have a loaf pan. However, I have a dutch oven, so I’m going to try out your recipe. Thank you!
    Anna

    Reply
  17. Rebecca

    This recipe was so wet there was no way to get the dough into the cast iron pan in the oven without completely deflating it from over handling. The bottom crust was burned after 20 minutes.

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen
      Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Rebecca, I’m very sorry to hear this. Is it possible you accidentally added too much water?
      I’ve had a question about the dough being too wet before, maybe the answer I gave then is useful for you too:
      The amount of water that flour absorbs is always a bit difficult to predict, as it depends on the weather, altitude, and condition of the flour. Maybe yours doesn’t absorb as much water. Though it’s never very easy to form the dough into a ball with the no-knead method, as it is a very wet dough. What you can try is to ‘pour’ your too wet dough in the very hot pan and proceed like described.

      Kind regards, Eva

      Reply
  18. Nadine

    Is that really a picture of spelt bread in the post? My spelt bread and muffins turn out brown, like a bran muffin. The loaf in the picture looks a lot like wheat flour.

    I’ve tried this recipe twice, and it is not bad, although it looks nothing like the crusty loaf in the picture.

    I’ve never been able to shape a no-knead loaf into a ball. They are always too wet and slimy, and if I use less water than there end up being dry floury spots. I just pour it into a greased stainless steel loaf pan and cover with tinfoil.

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen
      Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Nadine, Sorry to hear your breads look different. It is really spelt bread on the picture, and the organic spelt flour I use actually doesn’t look that different from ‘regular’ wheat flour (the spelt flour I currently use is by the brand Moulin des Moines, and I buy it at Bio c’ Bon here in Paris). I’m not always able to shape it into a ball either (how much liquid flour absorbs depends highly on the weather), I just put it in the pan and it works fine too. It’ll turn out a bit flatter than when shaped into a ball, but nonetheless good.
      Great to hear you’ve worked your way around it and found a solution that works for you! Fresh bread is the best there is :-)

      Reply
  19. Ewa too

    Dear Eva
    I like to try your spelt bread , but I have a question: After the second rising of your bread how you do transfer it to the Dutch oven without disturbing the rise? I bake bread and rolls from regular flour but I always place them on baking paper on Airbake cooking sheet for rise. After rise I insert them into 425 F oven without touching, because if I touch the raised dough it is losing the rise.

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen
      Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Ewa (great name :-))
      To ben honest, if I’m able to form a ball (which is not always the case) I do touch the dough with my hands. But I’ve found that it doesn’t disturbe the dough too much. Transferring it to baking paper sounds like a great solution though, I’m going to try that too ;-)
      Sometimes the dough is too sticky to form a proper ball, I just transfer it straight from bowl to Dutch oven. It’s more of a scraping/pouring process on those occasions, luckily this dough is pretty forgiving!

      Reply
  20. Olena

    Just tried to make this bread. It’s cooling now :) This is an easy recipe but the bake time must be reduced to total of maximum 35 minutes – 25 minutes under the lid and about 10 minutes without it (if baking at 450-480F). 45 minutes at these temperatures is way too much! No wonder people were getting lumps of coal. When I used to bake wheat bread on a preheated stone, 30 minutes was enough for the same loaf size. So I used this as a guideline and it turned out just perfect!

    Reply
    • Olena

      O, and I forgot to mention, I used a bit of olive oil to oil the bowl before placing the dough in there for the second rise. As well, I put olive on my hands when transferring dough from the bowl to the pot – it helped the dough not to stick to the hands or bowl :)

      Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen
      Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Olena, Thanks for your comment. Actually, I made this bread just 3 days ago following my recipe and it turned out as it always does (and that is not charcoal ;-). But ovens do vary, so it’s great that you’ve worked your way around it and giving tips to others! Also, thanks for the olive oil tip!! Will include that in my next update.

      Reply
  21. Julie

    I have a 50 pound bucket of spelt berries in the basement–I will use this recipe. Question– is the long rise a counter rise or in the refrigerator? I have heard that slack dough handles better cold.

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen
      Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Julie, the long rise is a counter rise. If you place it in the fridge that will slow down the process, so it will need to rise slower. I do believe the slower the rise, the better, but I usually don’t have the extra time ;-)

      Reply
      • Benjy

        Being that I bake a lot of sourdough bread, I like the looong fridge rise. Mine was put in the fridge yesterday about this time and taken out about 3-and-a-half hours ago, proofed in my “proofer” at 72F for a couple hours in the conventional bread tin after “shaping” it and lying it on the bottom of the oiled and floured pan. Not as high a percentage of water was used as in your recipe so shaping was simple and it rose triple the bulk and was delicious. the “oven-spring” was a little less than my other breads but still great for a first attempt at spelt. Thank you so much for the tips also.

  22. sharon

    hi Eva

    Can i check if the dough need to proof for 12 to 14hrs? Can i let the bread rise for 4 hours and bake?

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen
      Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Sharon, this recipe (without kneading) really needs a long rise, at least 12 hours. If you want to bake your bread sooner, you’ll have to use a more traditional recipe that involves kneading.
      Hope this helps! Eva

      Reply
  23. Soha

    Made this recipe and it was amazing. Currently making the bread for the 2nd time. My family is wheat free and vegan and this was a treat. Looking forward to eating the batch I am making. Want to try making it with olives and garlic next… Thank you!!!

    Reply
  24. gari

    I never let spelt bread rise for that length of time, my typical spelt bread recipe for a small loaf:

    *250grams (about a cup) Spelt flour
    *1 instant dry yeast packet (about 2.5 millilitres (1 teaspoon) of active dry yeast, I’d guess)
    *7.5millilitres (1.5 teaspoons) of honey dissolved in
    *Around 200 millilitres (about 6.75 fl ozs) of warm water
    *About 7.5 millilitres (a.5 teaspoons) of some kind of oil -I tend to use coconut or olive oils

    Throw Spelt flour and yeast into bowl, mix it up, add about 3/4 of water, mix, with a spatula or similar, and keep adding water until you get a ‘clumpy’ mass (you gradually add the rest of the water because the amount of water does vary a little batch to batch I find).

    Get your oil, with your clean hands put some oil on them and put remainder into the dough mix, the oil in the hands stops it sticking to your hands while you make the dough into a ball. I only ever ‘squish and squash’ the dough until I have a reasonably uniform looking ball…there is no point in kneading spelt, it doesn’t have as much gluten as bread flour etc

    I then cover the bread and leave it for up to an hour (sometimes I cook it straight away if camping, it is a bit heavier but tasty :-) ). I then put the bread on baking parchment on a baking tray (I prefer a flat loaf over a tinned one) on middle shelf, at 180C/356F for about half an hour, or so, I keep my eye on it around the 25 minutes mark, sometimes it needs more than 30 minutes, sometimes less.

    I have also taken to pan cooking the bread, just get an appropriately sized skillet, grill pan or whatever, put it on a low to middle heat, put a little oil on pan bottom, get it warm, put flattened dough in pan, watch it, and smell the air,when it smells like cooked bread, flip it up and see if the bread looks cooked, if so, turn and cook until the cooked smell appears again…flip it up and look to see if cooked…if all looks OK CAREFULLY tap topside of loaf to see if it sounds hollow -ergo is cooked…throw on plate and scoff.

    1) the bread, obviously, doesn’t rise as much as a dough proven for long periods, so isn’t as airy and light.
    2) the oil on the hands does stop the dough sticking to them, and also has the benefit of warming the oil; when I make this while camping, I tend to use coconut oil, and depending on daily temperature the oil may be solid (coconut oil melts at around 24C/75F, putting it on the hands melts it. Also, I find that if I use virgin raw coconut oil, the bread has an exotic coconut taste to it.

    Personally, I mess with breads all the time, I think it should be experimented with -hence my not very accurate recipe above. Bread is very underrated in my opinion…when we make it we can add all kinds of goodies to make it savoury or sweet. When made it can be used savoury or sweet, throw on some savoury food and you have a great meal when outdoors, throw on some sweetness -my favourite is honey- and you have a dessert. Bread must be one of the most versatile foodstuffs humans eat, and, of course, we don’t need to stick to grasses to make them, I use Besan, coconut and rice flour to make them, although they are best suited to flatbreads, obviously….

    People don’t seem to realise how much humanity is indebted to bread, once we cold make the stuff, we had a mobile food source, once we learned to grow, store and grind the grasses, we had a means of living overwinter without having to daily hunt for animals or scrub through deep snow to eat. The Roman Empire would not have been possible if it were not for bread, Spelt was a staple of the Roman army…I often get nostalgic and feel that connection with the past when I am out there, in nature, cooking and eating a spelt loaf, just as those conquerors did 2,000 years ago…or near a cave or place of beauty, wondering if even early some Paleo-human sat their breaking brad alone, or with their family…

    Reply
  25. louise

    Hi, my bread was inadvertently left out about 24 hrs to initially prove (i was called in to work)
    Is this OK?
    It did rise a little, but was still pretty wet?

    Louise

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen
      Eva in the Kitchen

      It is supposed to be pretty wet, but it should also have risen substantially, and be all bubbly. Did you still try to bake it? If you prove for this long, the best place next time would be in the fridge. The cooler temperature will slow down the process

      Reply
  26. Joanne Hayley

    Hi,
    Have you used wholemeal flour with the recipe. I know that usually you have to add more moisture when using wholemeal flours.

    Thanks
    Joanne

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen
      Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Joanne, I actually make it very often with wholemeal flour and I do tend to add a bit of extra water on those occasions. Not a lot, just 30 ml (give or take) to get rid of dry patches in the dough. Have a great weekend!

      Reply
  27. Kristy

    I will be trying this bread tomorrow in my cast iron dutch oven in my wood stove oven

    Reply
  28. ANN FLANIGAN

    Could you please give specific details on the size and type of Dutch oven you use? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen
      Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Ann, my cast iron pan has a thick bottom (it’s a very old one that I inherited from my grandmother so I can’t tell you the brand) and 23 cm in diameter, hope this helps!

      Reply
  29. Sharron

    The temperature here today is going to be hot. 37 degrees Celsius and I’m not turning that aircon on. I’m hoping I can leave it in front of the window for less than 12 hours. Does anyone have experience with this? First time with this bread recipe but make bread regularly. Some Spanish and Lebanese recipes I only need to leave for between one and four hours. Always looking for a good and easy bread recipe.

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen
      Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Sharron, because you really don’t do anything with the bread (no kneading to activate the yeast) it needs a lot of time to rise. However, if it’s that hot in your house I think you can do with less proofing time. No personal experience with baking in that heat (it’s not that warm over here ;-) so I hope your bread still comes out good!

      Reply
  30. Cat

    Hello! I have tried to make this bread three times, and have reduced the amount of water each too, only to get he same result. A few hours into the proofing, the dough rises nicely and retains its shape –but after 12 hours-16 hours, the dough shrinks, flattens and becomes a sloppy puddle. Reducing the amount of water does not seem to change this. Has this happened to you? What am I doing wrong. It appears that after proofing, the dough develops a pocket of liquid in the middle and when I dump it on the counter it bursts into a puddle. It is so liquid I can’t handle it. I have tried baking it anyway and it comes out as a hard flat disc. Any help appreciate!

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen
      Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Cat, sorry to hear that. This has never happened to me, and I make this recipe almost every other weekend. I’m trying to think of anything that could cause this, and I’m wondering what kind of flour you use? And do you use dry instant yeast or fresh yeast? Also, what kind of climate do you live in? Thanks, Eva

      Reply
    • Amber

      Seems like maybe your yeast died? Try using spring water or any water without chlorine. Tap water has chlorine, which kills yeast supposedly.

      Reply
  31. Amber

    Hi, Eva. I know the diameter of your Dutch oven is 23cm, but
    What is the depth?
    Is it a circle, oval, square, rectangle?
    Is it 23cm long ways or short ways?
    I think the most important measurement is what is the depth?

    I’m happy to try this. The closer I can get the to the size as yours, the better I will feel, although you may say the size is not important. Thanks.

    Also, a picture of your inherited Dutch oven would be fantastic!!

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen
      Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Amber, I just measured it, and it is 11 cm high. It’s a perfect round circle shaped cast iron oven. It’s bare iron, not coated (well, on the outside it is, not on the inside) but more than 60 years of cooking have left it with that kind of coating that only comes from intensive use. Hope this helps!

      Reply
      • Amber

        Awesome! Thanks for sharing the specs and measuring your Dutch oven again. I baked the bread in a enameled​ cast iron Dutch oven following all your instructions, and my entire household enjoyed it! Will be making it again :)

  32. Amber

    Oh, and is your Dutch oven a bare cast iron, or is it coated? Like with enamel or what not? You may be able to locate the brand on the bottom.

    Reply
  33. Zahra

    Hi.I made this bread today and it is delicious.but had some problems.I made the dough last night and untill I go to bed it had risen nicely,but this morning I woke up and see that it hasn’t rise a lot..maybe less than twice in size.and I read that you said it might be too wet and it was toooo wet! like consistency of a pancake batter.I added more flour and let it rise for an hour.I used a 24cm pan…and it came out so flat! and thin..yours look so beautiful.can I use a smaller 20cm to make it thicker slices? anyway the taste is good and I like it.Thank you for your recipe

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen
      Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Zahra, your pan is about the same size as mine (mine is 23 cm in diameter) so I don’t think that’s the problem. It sounds like your dough was really too wet, and by adding the flour at that late stage there wasn’t enough time for it to rise properly. When you say ‘pancake batter’ do you mean pancake batter that drips of a spoon (in other words, a really liquid batter, the kind you use for French crêpes) or the kind of batter you use for American pancakes? Because the latter (american pancake batter) isn’t that much less liquid than the bread dough should be, so the problem could be that you added too much flour in the end?
      Thanks! Eva

      Reply
      • zahra

        Well it was like the first batter you said..dripped of a spoon.I don’t know why it was too liquidy,I measured the flour and water carefully.will it make a change if I proof the yeast first and then add flour? I love making homemade bread and this tasted good.so I wanna try it again

      • Eva in the Kitchen
        Eva in the Kitchen

        Hi Zahra, some flour absorbs more water than others, also the climate and even your altitude can have an effect on how much liquid flour absorbs. It is therefore unfortunately impossible to give a recipe that works perfectly all over the world. It sounds like your flour just didn’t absorb that well. I don’t think proofing the yeast first will make a great difference, I would suggest you try adding not all of the water at once, but bit by bit. So that you can assess if your flour really needs the full quantity as stated in the recipe. Hope this helps!

    • Eva in the Kitchen
      Eva in the Kitchen

      Sorry to hear that Telse. I don’t know where you live but the problem might be a difference is standard tablespoon sizes, I find them smaller in Europe than in North-America.

      Reply
  34. Alan

    I made the no knead spelt bread today and it turned out perfectly, both in texture and taste. I followed the recipe exactly, let the dough sit for 17 hours for the first rise. The dough was very wet and sticky, couldn’t really form it into a ball and I didn’t want to add more flour, so just put it in a bowl as it was, sticky and wet. Excellent, like sour dough french bread. Thank you for posting the recipe!

    Reply
    • Eva in the Kitchen
      Eva in the Kitchen

      Hi Alan, thank you for your kind comment! It is exactly like you describe, at one point during the preparations you’re probably thinking ‘is this going well, it’s so sticky’ but then it always works out perfectly :-) Have a nice weekend!

      Reply
  35. Nathan

    This recipe is fantastic! Twice I have had success and I really s**k at cooking. Also I used a ceramic baking pot (Pentik, from Finland) the same way as the cast iron and worked superb! Many thanks! =D

    Reply

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